Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)


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Professional Learning Communities

How the Brain Learns. David A. Telling Ain't Training. Harold D. Lee Crockett. Editorial Reviews Review Sheryl and Lani are great examples of action researchers. As you read this book, keep in mind their commitment and passion as doers. They speak from experience and are experts at scaffolding learning.

As you consider new ways of supporting teachers or becoming a connected educator, this will be your go-to resource. This amazing book gives teachers and administrators the why and the how so that they can ramp up quickly and effectively. Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach is a veteran twenty-year educator. She has been a classroom teacher, technology coach, charter school principal, district administrator, university instructor, and digital learning consultant. Currently, she is completing her dissertation for her doctorate in educational planning, policy, and leadership at the College of William and Mary.

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Read reviews that mention professional development digital age ritter hall lani ritter sheryl nussbaum-beach leading in a digital learning and leading nussbaum-beach and lani social media personal learning connected learning sheryl and lani professional learning end of each chapter learning communities nussbaum-beach and lani ritter hall highly recommend get connected many books teachers and administrators.

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PDF Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Format: Perfect Paperback Verified Purchase. I had the opportunity to read this insightful book in publisher's galleys.


  1. Learn With Us;
  2. NEIGHBORING?
  3. BEAUTIFUL ROSES ALMOST THE WHOLE YEAR ROUND.

Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach and Lani Ritter Hall first make the case that teaching and learning have fundamentally changed forever with the advent of the Internet and its capacity to connect both adult and young learners to a world of content knowledge -- and more importantly -- a world of other learners who share our interests and passions and have expertise to offer. They then describe a new model of professional learning for teachers and other education leaders -- the Connected Learning Community.

What's that? CLC's have three key components: the face-to-face PLC; the personal learning network with its many social media connections, and participation in global communities of practice, which penetrate the surface level of inquiry usually associated with PLNs and dig deep into effective learning practices. The authors also advocate for a PBL approach to instruction, and within that acronym they include project-, problem- and passion-based learning. These inquiry learning strategies are all designed to shift the locus of control over the learning process in the direction of the student.

The authors are totally comfortable with core curriculum standards, checking for understanding through classroom assessments, and generally make the argument that engaged learning driven by student interests is compatible with challenging learning goals and "school reform.

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But Nussbaum-Beach and Ritter Hall actually describe what that looks like -- and end up defining an expanded and transformed role for the professional teacher in the 21st century. The ideas and insights share in The Connected Educator grow out of the authors' work with more than educators in the US, Canada and abroad through the company Powerful Learning Practice, co-founded by Nussbaum-Beach and edutech author and blogger Will Richardson. They report spending thousands of hours working and leading in virtual professional learning communities with teachers, principals and other educators to improve teaching practice and student learning.

I doubt there's another education author with a book on the market today that can claim this level of experience with Connected Learning Communities. Who's the book for? Teachers who are feeling the need, and perhaps the urge, to make the shift to more connected learning that emphasizes 21st century skills. Principals who are looking for ideas to help faculties shift to higher levels of practice. Professional development leaders who believe they can accelerate their work by embedding virtual components that tap into the potential of digital tools and connected communities.

It's also an interactive book Consider that in the past, teachers were usually provided with a textbook that included most of their necessary instructional resources. Curation for this ecosystem entails more than just collecting, gathering, and organizing. The process of curation involves the following purposeful activities:. Although the strategic process of curation has often been overlooked by K school districts, it has been a regular practice in higher education, museums, and libraries, and its necessity to business continues to grow in importance with the need to inform and educate workers and customers due to the abundance of information readily available online in the digital age.

Likewise, there are numerous reasons why the task of curating content should be systematically implemented within K school districts, including the following:. Without purposeful curation, it is impossible to realize the full impact of digital learning resources and initiatives. There would be no consistent approach to the acquisition and use of digital content to inform the improvement of teaching and learning practices.

Connected Professional Learning

Not only does curation help to ensure the quality of resources that are being utilized for instruction, but it also promotes equity, especially when those resources are incorporated within an accessible digital curriculum. In my next blog post, I will explore various strategies for content curation. This post is part of a series about the Building Blocks for Personalized Learning. By engaging in opportunities to make connections beyond the classroom to real-world learning activities and situations, students are better able to experience personalized learning.


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  4. Reward Yourself.
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  6. 8 Education Books for the Digital Age: Connected Educators Series - Brilliant or Insane?

When students make these connections, the learning is more authentic, relevant, and in turn becomes more personalized to their individual perspectives and goals. Joe Bandy, the Assistant Director of the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University, describes several benefits for students that are directly related to the goals of personalized learning.

One benefit is that by helping others, students are able to learn more about themselves and discover and develop their individual skills and abilities. Provide Ways for Students to Serve within the School — Some schools begin the year by suggesting various ways that students can volunteer in the learning community, such as working in a school store; assisting a teacher or media specialist; offering support to an office; organizing special events or school activities; being active in a club or group; or participating in a safety patrol.

Classrooms could be given a section of the school environment to beautify and maintain in order to encourage a sense of connection. Even typical classroom jobs give younger students the experience of contributing to their classroom learning community, and older students could be buddy readers for younger students or collaborators with technology and projects. Locate Experts to Share Experiences — Schools and teachers can help students develop greater connections by identifying experts to share their experiences. One way to begin this process is to utilize the expertise of parents and teachers.

When students hear about the paths that professionals have taken to achieve their careers and learn about specific occupations, they are able to make more informed goals and choices for their futures.

It is also beneficial for the community members as they begin to feel more connected to their local schools. The use of digital tools and resources, can facilitate the connection with experts outside of the local community. Collaborate with Local Organizations — There may be organizations within the community that can provide additional ways for students to contribute; to offer volunteer services, or to receive ongoing support.

Many of these organizations are already involved in some kind of local service or outreach, and as students begin interacting with them, they can better understand how a community works as a unit; is organized by its members; and collaborates to make necessary changes to benefit everyone. Through these experiences, they may learn more about themselves and their passions and interests. Reaching out to these organizations can be begin with parents at the school, but it may require some careful research into what resources are available and appropriate for student involvement. Connect with Local Businesses — By connecting with businesses, students are able to learn more about the types of local occupations that are available.

Having students participate in internships can facilitate this connection. Finding the right fit is important and will help students discover more about themselves and their abilities as they engage in real work. Each school should develop its own database of business contacts, and connecting with the local Chamber of Commerce might be a good way to begin this database. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also provides multiple resources for high school students for career planning. Provide Connections to Higher Education — Connecting with institutions of higher education is also another way of helping students develop greater understanding about what personally excites them concerning careers and education.

Many colleges and universities offer summer youth summer programs, and with these experiences, students may discover new unique talents. These activities are often offered for free or at a lower cost for students from low income families. Colleges are also a wealth of resources for connecting with experts in in particular fields who could be good sources of information for the classroom. In addition, many colleges and high schools offer dual enrollment for students who are willing and capable to participate in classes outside of high school allowing for a district to truly personalize an educational path for a student with special needs or talents.

Most districts already have information about these programs, but they need to ensure that the information is accessible and communicated to teachers, parents, and students. Facilitate Global Connections — Students often have difficulty seeing beyond their local communities and having a clear picture of themselves as members of a global community. Beginning with their own country and expanding throughout the world, students could discover more about opportunities that exist for making global connections.

This year, ISTE Connects published a blog post called 6 Resources for Fostering Global Education that provided some practical advice for educators to help students make global connections regardless of exceptions in age, language, or economics. Technology offers a variety of ways for classrooms to connect with each other throughout the world, and this provides students with a greater awareness of how they personally can participate within a global community.

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Market the Success — When students began to bridge the connection between their personal interests and aspirations to the available resources within the community at large, it is necessary to begin marketing and publishing this success. Not only is the recognition from marketing positive for the school to showcase its efforts, but it also benefits the members of the community. This marketing allows community members to highlight how they are collaborating with their local schools and providing ongoing support. Many schools also have their own site-based news broadcast, and these experiences can be shared via this medium throughout the school.

Incidentally, participating in the production of the school news is another way that students can volunteer their talents while developing new skills! These strategies help to communicate what students have learned and what they have accomplished.

Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies) Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)
Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies) Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)
Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies) Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)
Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies) Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)
Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies) Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)
Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies) Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)
Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies) Connected Educator, The: Learning and Leading in a Digital Age (Classroom Strategies)

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